Reflections on the Past Four Years

Robert Fulghum wrote a poem back in 1990 titled All I Ever Needed to know I Learned in Kindergarten.  In it he writes,

“These are the things I learned:

Share everything.

Play fair.

Don’t hit people.

Put things back where you found them.

Clean up your own mess.

Don’t take things that aren’t yours.

Say you’re sorry when you hurt somebody.

Wash your hands before you eat.

Flush.

Warm cookies and cold milk are good for you.

Live a balanced life – learn some and think some

and draw and paint and sing and dance and play

and work every day some.

Take a nap every afternoon.

When you go out into the world, watch out for traffic,

hold hands, and stick together.

Be aware of wonder.

Remember the little seed in the styrofoam cup:

The roots go down and the plant goes up and nobody

really knows how or why, but we are all like that.

Goldfish and hamsters and white mice and even

the little seed in the Styrofoam cup – they all die.

So do we.

And then remember the Dick-and-Jane books

and the first word you learned – the biggest

word of all – LOOK.

Everything you need to know is in there somewhere.

The Golden Rule and love and basic sanitation.

Ecology and politics and equality and sane living.

Take any of those items and extrapolate it into

sophisticated adult terms and apply it to your

family life or your work or your government or

your world and it holds true and clear and firm.

Think what a better world it would be if

all – the whole world – had cookies and milk about

three o’clock every afternoon and then lay down with

our blankies for a nap. Or if all governments

had a basic policy to always put thing back where

they found them and to clean up their own mess.

And it is still true, no matter how old you

are – when you go out into the world, it is best

to hold hands and stick together.”

 

As I was pondering what to do for my senior project and reflecting on the abundance of lessons I learned in high school; I realized I really wanted to write a letter similar to Fulghum’s poem to both freshman me looking back, and my sister as she is going to be a freshman next year.  Here is what I came up with.

Dear Freshman me,

All you really will ever need to know, you’ll know.

and even on the perchance that you don’t know,

being the resourceful girl you are, obviously you’ll Google it.

Knowledge will not be found in the $100,000 of college tuition debt, but rather in the classroom, on the playing field, and in everyday life.  These are the things you will learn by graduation day:

Everything is better with food.

Attitude is everything.

Find a couple of things you love and apply yourself to them.

YOLO is not the best way to make major life decisions.

Stress doesn’t get you anywhere in life.

A smile and a greeting can make a persons day.

Don’t give up; on people, on life, or in class.

Ask questions.

Don’t be afraid to stand up for yourself.

Dream big, because  if you reach for the moon and miss you’ll land on a star.

Take risks.

Waiting until the night before to start anything is a bad idea.

Don’t be afraid of change, change is healthy.

Make friends, and “When you go out into the world, watch out for traffic, hold hands, and stick together”.

Family is everything.  They have been yours from day one, and they will always love you.  Appreciate them.  Spend time with them.  Savor those dinnertime moments, those times where you are laughing so hard it hurts.  Soon you will be moving over 1000 miles away, eating dinner without your family; your presence at the dinner table thoroughly missed.

Dad and i edited

But take heart everything will be okay.  You will still be able to Facetime, go home on the holidays, go on family camping trips, stay home for summer, and sleep in your own bed in your own house.  You can still go home and eat home food; you don’t have to be a vegetarian forever.

Cherish those times with your sister.  Those she may sometimes feel like an annoyance, imitation is the highest form of flattery.  Go easy on her and make memories; she is only going to be an innocent middle schooler for so long.  Have fun.  Take adventures together. Be spontaneous.

rachel and i

When you start following these tips, there is one very important thing that you must do.  Can you guess what it is?

Have fun. Though that’s a good one; it’s not the most important piece of advice I have for you, because you will have fun anywhere and with anything.  The biggest regret you will have is not taking enough pictures. They say a picture is worth a thousand words, so take pictures on top of pictures on top of pictures.  There is no such thing as too many pictures, so snap away.  Capture the memories, you are only in high school once.

With love,

Senior you

senior Lindsey

An Open Letter to the Class of 2014

I don’t reblog a ton, but I stumbled upon this just after I submitted my early action applications and couldn’t help but reblog it.

“To the Class of 2014:

It’s been real.

Three years have gone by in the blink of an eye, and I have no doubt that the fourth will go by just as quickly. In fact, November is fast approaching, and it will be gone before we know it. For those of us who have November deadlines, time seems to be working at an even faster pace. But don’t worry, you’ll get through it. Thousands of people have gone before us, and they’ve all gone though it. If they can do it, we, the Class of 2014, will surely be able to do it as well.

But while you’re in the midst of this process, a question that you’ve probably been asking yourself is, “What have I actually done in high school?” The college application season is tough, but the added possibility of feeling less than great when evaluating your accomplishments against those of your peers makes it all the more stressful. To that, I say let it be. You are who you are, and who you are is the best version of yourself that you can possibly be.

So what if you never started a club during your time in high school? If you were never a star varsity athlete? If you were never captain of your Mock Trial team? If you were never Prom King or Queen? If you were never that popular person on ASB? Be content with who you are. These past four years have been an experiment in learning, in socializing, and discovering who you are. Take what’s been given to you, and go with it.

The next four years after high school will be an experiment as equally challenging as that AP Chem lab where you would always get 1000% for your percent error, as equally challenging as that AP Physics test that you tried so hard to ace, but you just couldn’t do it. But unlike those labs and tests, it will be fun. Embrace what you have, don’t let it be a hindrance to what you can be. Remember this: the sum of your mistakes is not greater than the potential of your future.

We live in a world that’s driven by success. Success in academics, success in athletics, success in career, success in wealth, success in anything, really. It’s hard to not get caught up in this pursuit of success. However, always remember that your success can only be measured by yourself. The choices that you make, the possibilities that you pursue, the results that you obtain, they are all driven by what you, and you yourself, have chosen to do. Do what you want; don’t let others tell you what to do.

Some of us will go down in history, whether as politicians, actors, businessmen, criminals, or just as overall outstanding individuals. Most of us will not. Most of us will strive to be great, to be successful, to be known, but most of us will fall short of that. But once again, be content.

Be content in who you are, but be proud of this amazing group that you come from. You are greater, you are stronger, you are better than you think. You are the Class of 2014.”

via An Open Letter to the Class of 2014.

When I first looked at the Common Application, I thought “Oh no. I am never going to get into college. I have not done ten different activities plus community service and I most certainly do not have numerous academic awards.”  Then as I sat down and looked at my résumé and thought about all the amazing things I have done in my life, it dawned on me.  Colleges need a variety of students to create the “diverse campus” that they all brag about.  Colleges can’t only accept the people who do every activity possible, because though they would have an involved student body, everything would be half done because the people involved are stretching themselves so thin.  They need the athletes, the nerds, the social butterflies, the musicians, the quiet thinkers, the teachers pets, the volunteers, and the categories keep going on and on.  Whatever category I fit in to, a college would want me to add to their community of students.  I realized that I just needed to be proud of what I had accomplished and let that shine through in my application.  I needed to capitalize on what makes me unique.  Once I found the passions and uniqueness that I wanted to highlight, the applications became so much easier.  Good luck Class of 2014, and don’t stress out too much, because it will all work out in the end.  You will find a way to be happy wherever you end up going.